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Archive for April 8th, 2014

8
Apr
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Report: Samsung SM-T800 10.5″ AMOLED tablet specs


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It is reported that Samsung will be adding a new tablet to their huge tablet line, codenamed as Samsung SM-T800. Folks over at SAMMobile are reporting that it is a 10.5-Inch tablet with Android 4.4.2 KitKat right out of the box, and a Super AMOLED display of 2560×1600 resolution. Check out what else is there:

  • Quad-core Snapdragon processor (S801)
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 8-megapixel rear and 2-megapixel front-facing cameras
  • 16/32/64GB of storage
  • microSD slot
  • USB 2.0 connectivity
  • 7,900 mAh battery

The tablet is just Wi-Fi-only, but LTE supported model is also in the pipeline as well. Right now, no words on the release date and the price, but we will let you know as soon as they reveal it. Are you looking forward to it?

Source: SAMMobile

The post Report: Samsung SM-T800 10.5″ AMOLED tablet specs appeared first on AndroidGuys.

8
Apr
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Unreal Engine 4 to support Windows Phone and Windows RT, but not anytime soon


Unreal Engine 4 to support Windows Phone and Windows RT, but not anytime soon

Unreal Engine 4′s new $19 subscription option might be real tempting for developers on a budget, unless, of course, they’re hoping to make games for Windows Phone and Windows RT. Although Epic Games’ next-gen engine doesn’t work with the aforementioned flavors of Microsoft’s OS, that might be changing, albeit slowly. Tim Sweeney, the studio’s co-founder and CEO, divulged on the software’s forums that the firm’s already doing leg work to support the platforms. “We have been doing some work in this direction (implementing various levels of WinRT API support) and we want to have Windows Phone support eventually, but we’re a very long way from having a ship-quality implementation,” Sweeney said. Still, the head honcho adds that their focus will remain on Android and iOS development before branching out to Microsoft’s other flavors of Windows. Impatient devs can stick with Unreal Engine 3, but those aching for the latest tools will have to sit tight a while longer.

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Source: Unreal Engine Forums

8
Apr
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JVC’s first 4K movie cameras include one for flying drones


JVC's 4K aerial drone camera

JVC wants into the digital moviemaking business, and it’s kicking things off in style with a quartet of 4K camera prototypes that illustrate its cinematic ambitions. The highlight is the GW-GBLS1 (shown here), a gimbal-mounted Super 35mm camera designed for aerial drones; it can both shoot overhead 4K footage and stream live video to the ground. There’s also the GW-SPLS1, a remote-controlled miniature 4K camera for trickier shots. More conventional cinematographers should be happy, too. The GY-LSX1 puts 4K and super slow-motion 240p video into a shoulder-mounted camera, while the GY-LSX2 stuffs the LSX1′s sensor into a camcorder that uses Micro Four Thirds lenses. JVC hasn’t said if or when these particular cameras will reach studios, but we wouldn’t count on the aerial model reaching the US without legal clarity regarding commercial drone flights.

[Image credit: DV Info]

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Via: No Film School, DV Info

Source: JVC

8
Apr
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FCC Chairman to broadcasters: It’s time to catch up with Netflix and Yahoo


While the NAB show is all about high-end cameras and workflow solutions for broadcast professionals, the show is a great opportunity to talk about industry policy as well. Yesterday, NAB president Gordon Smith criticized the FCC for “favoring broadband over the broadcast industry,” and today FCC head Tom Wheeler took the stage to address a broadcast-heavy crowd. In his one-hour talk, he touched on the importance of competition and the FCC’s role in carrying out the US Senate’s mandates, but the most interesting moments came when Wheeler lectured broadcast licensees on their need to adapt and change. “Lecture” may be putting it lightly, though; the implication in Wheeler’s remarks was that broadcast companies haven’t evolved as quickly as services like Netflix, and that there’s some serious catching up to do.

According to the Chairman, third-party content providers such as Netflix and Hulu are effectively eating broadcasters’ lunch by purchasing programming from the same studios and networks that broadcasters do. Considering how often Americans watch TV news online, Wheeler said, there’s a great opportunity for broadcast licensees to leverage local content to become more competitive. Rubbing a bit more salt in the wound, he also mentioned Yahoo’s recent efforts in news syndication and telecom companies’ ventures in broadcast LTE. As he explained, “Clearly, Yahoo, AT&T and Verizon are… all embracing something new that looks startlingly like your model. Because we are pro-competition, we hope broadcast licensees will see this as a call to action.”

Finally, Wheeler closed by addressing the upcoming spectrum incentive auction in 2015. He believes the sale represents “a terrific financial opportunity for broadcasters,” as it gives them the chance to expand business on somebody else’s dime. No shortage of marching orders for an industry looking to solidify its competitive stance, but Wheeler’s message was overall a positive one: “We want to work with you to focus on the future. Our job at the FCC is to facilitate innovation.”

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8
Apr
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The HTC One M8 has a Google Play edition, but how is it different? (hands-on)


HTC’s latest flagship device, the One M8, is one of the best Android smartphones now available on the market, but what would happen to it if Google stripped the phone of some of its customizations? That’s essentially what the Google Play edition of the new One offers. Plunk down $699 and you’ll have access to an unlocked and (mostly) unadulterated version of the M8 with stock Android 4.4 (also known as KitKat).

Of course, we’ve been curious to see what will happen to the features that make the new One unique. HTC told us that the Google Play edition will be able to take advantage of the Duo Camera, for instance, but does it still offer the same functionality? Additionally, can we use the Motion Launch gestures to wake up the phone and access different features? And how about that clever Dot View case that comes in so handy on the Sense version? Look no further for the answers.

We won’t spend much time on the GPe’s hardware, because it’s exactly the same. You’re still going to get the same 5-inch 1080p display, 2,600mAh battery, BoomSound speakers, rear UltraPixel camera and 5MP front-facing selfie shooter. This particular model is a silver-colored 32GB version and comes with dual-band LTE (700MHz and AWS), which gives you next-gen speeds on AT&T and T-Mobile; no word yet on if we’ll see any regional variants outside the US. Finally, the GPe also has quad-band HSPA+ 21Mbps (850/AWS/1900/2100) and quad-band GSM/EDGE.

Let’s move onto the software, which is what makes the GPe unique and interesting. First, we’ll tackle the Duo Camera. If you’ve read our review, you’ll have a good grasp on what it’s all about. The M8 comes with two cameras on the back: there’s HTC’s 4MP UltraPixel sensor on the bottom and a smaller sensor on the top that’s primarily used for depth imaging. This setup gives you the ability to mess with a few more post-processing editing tricks than is offered on most other smartphones. HTC will also be throwing in options for developers to take advantage of the two rear cameras.

Frankly, it’d be silly to have extra hardware on a phone that’s completely unusable, so the Google Play edition will still take advantage of the Duo Camera functionality. Predictably, the app itself is the stock Google version, but the HTC magic comes out as soon as you enter the Photos app and try editing your shots. You’ll be prompted to open up “HTC Photo Edit,” and you’ll see a screen that looks much like what you’d find in the Sense gallery but with fewer options: UFocus, Dimension Plus and Touch Up are the only Duo Camera-esque effects listed, which means the Foregrounder, Seasons and Copy/Paste functions didn’t make the cut. (Filters, frames and tools are still hanging out on the right sidebar.) UFocus is our favorite of the Duo Camera options, so we’re glad to see it there, but Dimension Plus is a useless and gimmicky feature that we just don’t use very often.

Motion Launch is also around and it’s still pretty useful, but there’s one caveat. You can still double-tap to wake, press the volume button and lift the phone to activate the camera and swipe the screen in any direction to unlock it — all of the core features remain. The only thing it lacks is the ability to swipe different directions and have it do different things (ie. swipe down to activate voice dial).

The Dot View case also works, but again, it doesn’t get the full functionality it enjoys on the Sense version. On the Google Play edition, you can view the time and weather, but from what we can tell, there are no other notifications to take advantage of.

There’s one other nicety about the phone that shouldn’t go unnoticed: despite its Google branding, HTC still includes the device as part of its Advantage program, which means HTC will replace your screen for free if you break it within the first six months.

If you love the HTC One M8 hardware but prefer a stock Android experience (and one that will likely get updated faster), this is where the Google Play edition comes in handy. Interestingly, this particular version is a little unique compared to others of its kind, mainly due to the extra camera and motion gesture capabilities built into the hardware; there’s certainly still some HTC features that you wouldn’t normally find on, say, a Nexus phone. Whether or not this makes it any less of a vanilla Android device may be up to your own interpretation, but this kind of differentiation at least gives it a little more flavor than it otherwise would have. The best part: if you don’t like the extra features, simply turn them off.

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8
Apr
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The Weather Channel comes back to DirecTV, but now with less reality TV


After dragging on for months, a standoff between DirecTV and The Weather Channel has ended and the winner is pretty clear. In mid-January TWC went dark on the satellite service and DirecTV started pushing the three people left who don’t get their weather info from the internet to another channel, WeatherNation. There hadn’t been any movement since, but after news a few days ago that DirecTV signed a multiyear deal with WeatherNation, it appears The Weather Channel finally blinked.

A statement announcing the deal includes an apology to DirecTV and its customers from Weather Company CEO David Kenny, plus a promise to cut TWC’s reality TV programming by half on weekdays (Deadliest Space Weather is a real show). Other throw ins include the return of instant local weather and letting DirecTV subscribers stream The Weather Channel’s video feed to other devices over the internet no matter where they are. Now that this long national nightmare is over (DirecTV is still duking it out with the Dodgers, PAC-12 and CSN Houston networks), we’re hoping they go back and add a line ending TWC’s silly new practice of naming winter storms — that’s not a thing, stop it.

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Source: DirecTV

8
Apr
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Netflix App Updates with New Second Screen UI and Performance Improvements


The Netflix app on Android has been updated. It offers up some playback optimizations that should help make things a bit speedier in your Netflix viewing. While that is nice, it is the second screen enhancements that a little bit more welcomed, especially for those using Netflix from their device to a Chromecast. Below is the old second screen view you would see when you are casting.

Netflix update 4-7 (4)Now, here is what the new Netflix second screen looks like.

Netflix Chromecast Netflix ChromecastYou can see the banner for the movie/tv show is shrunk and displayed in the middle. Below that you see where you are casting to and you can tap it to change the cast device. You can now rewind in 30 second intervals versus the previous 10 second intervals as denoted by the small near circle with the two arrow heads. At the top you have the name of the show or movie with a small arrow that you can tp to bring it up full screen or minimize it down to view the Netflix library.

It certainly looks a bit better and it seemed to start the movie a little quicker when selecting it to cast.

The update is live in the Play Store so feel free to pick it up when you have a minute.


Get it on Google Play

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8
Apr
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Samsung Gets Smarter, Updating the Gear Fit to go into Portrait Viewing


When Samsung announce the Gear Fit my immediate thought was “Who the hell looks sideways at their wrist.” The devices screen orientation was laid out to go horizontally taking up the screen real estate quite nicely, but it just didn’t make much sense to me.

Galaxy Gear Fit

Thankfully, it looks like Samsung wised up a bit after their initial announcement and have an update on the way already that will revamp the layout into portrait viewing. Giving you a much easier viewing experience when it comes to looking at your wrist for information. Details are not clear as to when the update will begging to roll out though. SamMobile has picked up an image of the Gear Fit in portrait viewing that was snapped at an official Samsung Store in Korea is pretty convincing that it is close. Although I am sure Samsung is having to do quite a lot of work to revamp all the apps to be compatible in the more traditional viewing angle.

The Gear Fit, along with the Galaxy S5 and Gear 2 are all set for global release on April 11th. I am sure that people that are interested won’t mind waiting for the update anyways. Hopefully Samsung has it all ready to go at launch though.

Source: SamMobile

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8
Apr
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Robert Downey Jr. Gets Serious in New HTC One (M8) Video


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Remember when HTC announced that Robert Downey Jr. was going to show up in HTC commercials? Iron Man promoting the all metal phone seemed like it couldn’t go wrong. Sadly, it didn’t exactly go right, and many of us wondered how much longer Downey was going to continue his campaigns. Gary Oldman starred in the very first New HTC One commercial, and it took a more serious, yet funny approach. Today, HTC released a new video for the New One, and look at that: Robert Downey Jr.

There are no trolls washing cars in this video. No, Downey gets a little serious with you, because he wants you to get yourself the All New HTC One. So check it out, and let us know what you think about it.

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8
Apr
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Android Wear smartwatch will need a paired smartphone to function


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Google’s Android Wear platform is something that has created a lot of excitement for the future of smartwatches, but one aspect that has been up for debate was if the Android Wear smartwatches, such as the Moto 360, will work standalone or will require a paired smartphone to function.

However, jn a recent video on the Ask a Dev YouTube channel, Android engineer Sagar Seth explained that Android Wear will only allow developers to add support for smartwatches to their existing apps.

“Remember one thing: it’s not a full-fledged application sitting on the wearable itself,” Seth says. “It is just notifications. It is making the information available when you need it.”

What this means is that whilst Android Wear will provide the tools necessary to create graphics and notifications for the new smartwatch platform, the smartwatches themselves don’t actually run standalone Android apps and will require a connection to a smartphone.

The post Android Wear smartwatch will need a paired smartphone to function appeared first on SmarterWatching.

Read the rest at the source, SmarterWatching.com

The post Android Wear smartwatch will need a paired smartphone to function appeared first on AndroidGuys.

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